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Major Takeaways:

  • Resembling Google Glass, the Recon Jet Smart glasses is aimed at athletes, providing GPS, a Bluetooth hookup, and gyro sensors through real-time updates in the user’s peripheral vision.
  • Using infrared glance-detection sensors, the small screen on the left side can only be seen if users look down towards it.
  • Right now, the glasses do not connect to the internet, but Intel is working to fix that.

From the Daily Mail:

 

  • The Recon Jet device show notifications in the wearer’s peripheral vision
  • These are shown on an embedded display attached to the headset
  • It uses infrared glance-detection to show info only when you look down
  • Chip-maker Intel acquired Recon last year in a $175 million deal

Cyclists and runners will soon be able to go for miles without having to check their phones thanks to a concept headset by chip giant Intel.

The device, called Recon Jet, looks similar to Google Glass and is fitted with GPS, gyro sensors and Bluetooth so it can track journeys as well as show information during the workout.

The headset is on display at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona and delivers notifications in real-time to the rider’s peripheral vision via a Google Glass-style display beneath the lens.

Recon Jet (pictured) is on display at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona and delivers notifications in real-time to the rider's peripheral vision via a Google Glass-style display beneath the lens. It looks similar to Google Glass and is fitted with GPS, gyro sensors and Bluetooth so it can track journeys

The smart glasses are powered by a 1GHz dual-core processor, 1GB of RAM and 8GB of storage.  The small screen is hidden on the left hand-side of the goggles and can only be seen if riders look down towards it thanks to an infrared glance-detection sensor that knows when the wearer is looking at the screen.

This ensures runners or riders are not distracted while on the road.

The smart eyewear could help make riding safer for cyclists or runners that are likely to check messages on their phones while at traffic lights or junctions, for example.

Recon Jet was originally made by Recon Instruments, which was acquired by Intel last summer for an undisclosed sum – although it was rumored to be in the region of $175 million.

At the moment Recon Jet can’t connect to the web, although Intel may be working to add that feature.

In fact, the chip-maker could be soon pimping up the headset with its Curie module – a tiny chip the size of a shirt button that provides powerful compute to wearables as well as an internet connection. 

Head over to the Daily Mail for a full update.