Tags

Major Takeaways:

  • Thalmic Lab’s Myo Armband was recently used to control a prosthetic limb using electric impulses transmitted from an amputee’s mind to his limb.
  • Johnny Matheny, who lost his limb to cancer, used a Myo armband attached right above his prosthetic limb.  When he thinks about making a gesture, like would have done with his original limb, the prosthetic limb makes the same gesture.

From the article

Researchers at Johns Hopkins University have used a Myo armband, made by Waterloo, Ontario’s Thalmic Labs, to control a prosthetic limb using electric impulses transmitted from an amputee’s mind to his limb.

Until now, we’ve mostly seen the Myo used in applications involving things like playing video games, controlling devices like drones or motorized vehicles, starting and stopping a music player, etc.

The armband works by reading the electromyographical (EMG) impulses triggered by a thought from a person’s brain sending a signal to a limb, which causes a movement…

“The Myo, in Johnny’s case, is picking up the EMG signals, or the muscle activation signals, in the upper part of his arm,” said Thalmic Labs co-founder and CEO Stephen Lake. “The project has been a great stride forward integrating Myo with prosthetics. We’re very, very excited to see what further research and more and more people looking at this area can do with Myo and the open API, especially in the area of prosthetics.”

When he thinks about making a gesture, as he would have done with his original limb, the prosthetic makes the same gesture.

“The APL arm is the most unique arm I’ve ever worn,” said Matheny. “It has the ability to do anything that your natural hand, wrist, elbow or shoulder can do.”

Mr. Matheny’s prosthetic is also unique, developed by the Applied Physics Lab to mount directly to his residual limb, or stump, rather than being attached as an accessory…

Check out CanTech for the full article, and a video of the prosthetic limb in use.